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Gingerbread Cookie Recipes

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Gingerbread foods vary, ranging from a soft, moist loaf cake to something close to a ginger snap.

From Wikipedia – Gingerbread

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Gingerbread Ingredients

Gingerbread refers to a broad category of baked goods, typically flavored with ginger, cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon and sweetened with honey, sugar, or molasses.

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Gingerbread History

Gingerbread is claimed to have been brought to Europe in 992 CE by the Armenian monk Gregory of Nicopolis (also called Gregory Makar and Grégoire de Nicopolis).

He left Nicopolis (in modern-day western Greece) to live in Bondaroy (north-central France), near the town of Pithiviers.

He stayed there for seven years until his death in 999 and taught gingerbread baking to French Christians. 

It may have been brought to Western Europe from the eastern Mediterranean in the 11th century.

Gingerbread came to the Americas with settlers from Europe. Molasses, which were less expensive than sugar, soon became a common ingredient and produced a softer cake.

The first printed American cookbook, American Cookery by Amelia Simmons, contained seven different recipes for gingerbread. Her recipe for “Soft gingerbread to be baked in pans” is the first written recipe for the cakey old-fashioned American gingerbread.

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Gingerbread Cookie Recipes
Gingerbread Cookie Recipes

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